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Fall 2022 New Courses and Special Topic Offerings

Want to understand emerging fields like planetary health, paleoclimatology, or quantum computing? Or would you rather explore the Gateway to a Medical Career or take a seminar series to quickly expand the knowledge of your field?  

Consider taking one or more of the 20+ exciting new and special topics courses in Fall 2022. 

students studying

New Course Offerings

Use the drop down menu to review the course descriptions. For more detailed course information, visit PatriotWeb and search for the course’s subject and number (i.e. BIMR 480).

Biomedical Research

BIMR 480: Gateway to a Medical Career
The mission of this class is to prepare students for many types of medical careers. Students will revisit notions acquired in previous chemistry and biology classes and contextualize them in relation to human diseases. Systemic approach to physiology and pathology of human diseases will be undertaken, with emphasis on cancer biology. 

CRN: 83115

Bioinformatics

BINF 401: Bioinformatics/Computational Biology I
Covers the following topics and related methodology: protein sequence, structure prediction, and modeling methods; nucleic acid sequence and structure prediction; gene structure prediction in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; elements of system biology. Students will learn programming approaches to solve bioinformatics problems.

Fall 2022 Course Details

Environmental Science and Policy

EVPP 428: Planetary Health
As the pace and scale of human impacts on Earth’s natural systems continue to increase, there is growing importance in understanding and quantifying the implications of these accelerating changes for human health. Throughout this course, we will study ‘Planetary Health’ which addresses the human health impacts of accelerating environmental change through interdisciplinary approaches including environmental science, political science, and public health.

CRN: 81951

EVPP 430: Fundamentals of Environmental GIS
Provides the basic knowledge to explore complex environmental data sets and relationships among biological, ecological, physical and anthropogenic variables using geographic information systems. Using spatial mapping and exploration tools students will be capable of independent analysis of complex environment. Notes: Previous knowledge of fundamentals of geography, coordinate systems and map projections is an asset. Knowledge of operating systems, text editor and spreadsheet is required. 

CRN: 78323

EVPP 445: Principles of Environmental Toxicology
Explores basic principles of toxicology with an emphasis on the environment. Includes the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of toxicants; mechanisms of toxic action; genetic toxicology; ecotoxicology as well as specific examples important toxicants. Introduces regulatory toxicology and human and ecological risk assessment.

CRN: 78288

EVPP 456: Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology
In Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology, a combined undergraduate and graduate course, students will learn the fascinating ecology of invertebrates from freshwater, brackish, and marine systems. By the end of the course, students will understand the phylogeny, life histories, behaviors, trophic importance, adaptations to life in water, conservation significance, and global environmental change of aquatic invertebrates in different ecosystems. As part of the laboratory component, students will sample several aquatic habitats for specimens, bring them back to the lab, and learn the skills necessary to identify species. At the end of the course, students will be familiar with methods for measuring aquatic invertebrate density, biomass, and diversity as well as the proper curation methods for preserving aquatic invertebrates,

CRN: 82287

EVPP 480: Sustainability in Action
Students engage in practical aspects of realizing sustainability goals and gain career skills transferring theory into practice.

CRN: 78313

EVPP 528: Planetary Health
As the pace and scale of human impacts on Earth’s natural systems continue to increase, there is growing importance in understanding and quantifying the implications of these accelerating changes for human health. Throughout this course, we will study ‘Planetary Health’ which addresses the human health impacts of accelerating environmental change through interdisciplinary approaches including environmental science, political science, and public health.

CRN: 81953

EVPP 530: Evidence-Based Environmental Policymaking
Longstanding calls for a “new social contract for science” demand that environmental scientists help meet societal needs by providing information to address global problems such as biodiversity conservation and climate change. But scientists’ generation of what they perceive to be useful research doesn’t necessarily equate to its usability in policy decisions. Through readings, guest lectures, and a variety of hands-on assignments, this course will explore the meaning of “evidence-based policymaking,” the benefits—and limitations—of using science in decision-making, and ways that individuals and organizations can build capacity, whether within research or policymaking institutions.

CRN: 81952

EVPP 556: Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology
In Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology, a combined undergraduate and graduate course, students will learn the fascinating ecology of invertebrates from freshwater, brackish, and marine systems. By the end of the course, students will understand the phylogeny, life histories, behaviors, trophic importance, adaptations to life in water, conservation significance, and global environmental change of aquatic invertebrates in different ecosystems. As part of the laboratory component, students will sample several aquatic habitats for specimens, bring them back to the lab, and learn the skills necessary to identify species. At the end of the course, students will be familiar with methods for measuring aquatic invertebrate density, biomass, and diversity as well as the proper curation methods for preserving aquatic invertebrates. 

CRN: 84679

Mathematics

MATH 462: Mathematics of Machine Learning and Industrial Applications I
Basic mathematical optimization and probability theory in the context of classical learning and gradient based methods including neural networks. Incorporates modern tools such as Python, shell tools, and version control. Includes industrial applications in satellite imagery, physics, biology and engineering. Computational and analytic assignments are given.

CRN: 80080

MATH 463: Mathematics of Machine Learning and Industrial Applications II
Basic mathematical and probabilistic models and derivations for convolutions, stability, regularization, inverse and optimal control problems, and dynamical systems in the context of semi-supervised learning. Mathematical and numerical aspects of stochastic descent methods, Nesterov accelerated gradient, AdaGrad, Adam, with applications to convolutional, deep, and ODE networks. Further applications include imaging and computer vision, saliency maps, segmentation, satellite Imagery, and physics informed learning. 

CRN: 80174

MATH 464: Linear Algebra with Data Applications
Structure of linear spaces and the operator algebra, duality, invariants, Jordan and singular value decompositions, spectral theorem. Rigorous derivation of foundational data science methods such as PCA, MDS, and SVM. Computational and analytic assignments are given.

CRN:  80832

MATH 662: Mathematics of Machine Learning and Industrial Applications I
Basic mathematical and probabilistic models and derivations for linear and logistic regression including regularization and application to SVM and PCA. Mathematical and numerical aspects of classical learning methods such as Kernel methods andgradient based methods including neural networks. Incorporates modern tools such as Python, shell tools, and version control. Includes industrial scale applications in satellite imagery, physics, biology and engineering. Computational and analytic assignments are given.

CRN: 80079

MATH 663: Mathematics of Machine Learning and Industrial Applications II
Basic mathematical and probabilistic models and derivations for convolutions, stability, regularization, inverse and optimal control problems, and dynamical systems in the context of semi-supervised learning. Mathematical and numerical aspects of stochastic descent methods, Nesterov accelerated gradient, AdaGrad, Adam, with applications to convolutional, deep, and ODE networks. Further applications include imaging and computer vision, saliency maps, segmentation, satellite Imagery, and physics informed learning. 

CRN: 80175

MATH 664: Linear Algebra with Data Applications
Structure of linear spaces and the operator algebra, duality, invariants, Jordan and singular value decompositions, spectral theorem. Rigorous derivation of foundational data science methods such as PCA, MDS, and SVM. Computational and analytic assignments are given

CRN: 80833

Neuroscience

NEUR 424: Sleep and Circadian Rhythms

This course introduces the fields of circadian rhythms with emphasis on sleep including the underlying molecular and genetic machinery, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology. The impact of sleep and lack thereof will be explored on diseases and modern society. Considerable time will be spent reading and analyzing the primary literature in human and animal models.

Special Topics Courses

Bioinformatics

BINF 704: Colloquium in Bioinformatics
Description coming soon 

CRN: 71091

BINF 704: Colloquium Speaker Series
Description coming soon 

CRN: 73294

BINF 739 DL1: Neurobiology of Decision Making
Description coming soon 

CRN: 76082

BINF 739 DL2: Next Generation Sequencing
Description coming soon 

CRN: 75378

Biology (100 and 400 level)

BIOL 101: Biology Freshman Seminar
This course is for first-seminar freshman with a declared biology major. This 1-credit BIOL elective will serve as a platform for freshman biology students to get practical advice and guidance for how to approach coursework, careers in biology, and professionalism

CRN: 81948

BIOL 417: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I
Covers the following topics and related methodology: protein sequence, structure prediction, and modeling methods; nucleic acid sequence and structure prediction; gene structure prediction in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; elements of system biology. Students will learn programming approaches to solve bioinformatics problems.

CRN: 74717

BIOL 417: Biology Seminar
Selected Topics

CRN: 80984

BIOL 417: Paleoclimatology
Explores the natural evolution of Earth's climate with the goal of providing a baseline for understanding present climate variability and future trends through increased knowledge of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence climate over the long-term.

CRN: 73400

BIOL 417: Research and Development in Biotech Companies
This course focuses on Research and Development approaches and methodologies used in solving critical problems in biosciences/life sciences through biotechnology.  We will go through various steps needed for biomedicine and biotechnology related product development and commercialization.  Agricultural and medical technologies will be covered in a case study format.  Students will develop skills to evaluate novel technologies and methodologies, including patent analysis, literature data extraction and analysis, and learn to formulate research plans. One of co-instructors is an alumna of NSF ICorps program - immersive training which prepares scientists to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory — accelerating pathway for cutting-edge biotechnologies to the market

CRN: 75033

BIOL 417: Principles of Environmental Toxicology
Explores basic principles of toxicology with an emphasis on the environment. Includes the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of toxicants; mechanisms of toxic action; genetic toxicology; ecotoxicology as well as specific examples important toxicants. Introduces regulatory toxicology and human and ecological risk assessment.

CRN: 80298

BIOL 417: Water and Disease
Description coming soon

CRN: 75225

Biology (500 and 600 level)

BIOL 506: Selected Topics in Microbiology
Description coming soon

CRN: 81782

BIOL 508: Research and Development in Biotech Companies
This course focuses on Research and Development approaches and methodologies used in solving critical problems in biosciences/life sciences through biotechnology.  We will go through various steps needed for biomedicine and biotechnology related product development and commercialization.  Agricultural and medical technologies will be covered in a case study format.  Students will develop skills to evaluate novel technologies and methodologies, including patent analysis, literature data extraction and analysis, and learn to formulate research plans. One of co-instructors is an alumna of NSF ICorps program - immersive training which prepares scientists to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory — accelerating pathway for cutting-edge biotechnologies to the market

CRN: 73579

BIOL 508: Selected Topics Animal Biology
Description coming soon

CRN: 76145

BIOL 691: Fundamental Concepts of Evolution
This course will provide a basic refresher on basic concepts and mechanisms in evolution and of their applications to different fields, from theoretical biology to applied science. Material used in this course includes a textbook in evolution to cover the basics concepts, a book on the history of evolutionary thinking, and articles focusing on the history, development and application of these concepts.

Learning objectives: Students will familiarize themselves with key concepts in evolution and evolutionary thinking. Students will also get the opportunity of seeing how these concepts can be applied to address different scientific questions and how evolutionary thinking is the basis of many integrative and comparative studies. One of the main goals of this course is to develop and improve communication skills, critical thinking, and the capacity of integrating distinct ideas, theories and mechanisms crucial to understanding and studying evolution.

CRN: 79647

BIOL 695: Colloquium Speaker Series
Description coming soon

CRN: 71525

BIOL 695: Tularemia an Ongoing Biothreat

Description coming soon

CRN: 75377

BIOL 695: Applications of Genomics in Health

Description coming soon

CRN: 74551

BIOL 695: Seminar: Molecular/Microscopic/Cell Biology

Description coming soon

CRN: 76568

Biosciences

BIOS 704: Tularemia an Ongoing Biothreat

Description coming soon

CRN: 76021

BIOS 704: Colloquium Speaker Series
Description coming soon

CRN: 72624

BIOS 704: Apps of Genomics in Health

Description coming soon

CRN: 75925

BIOS 704: Topics in Biosciences
Description coming soon

CRN: 80466

Computational and Data Sciences

CDS 486: Julia for Data Sciences
Description coming soon

CRN: 81905

CDS 899: Colloquium/Computational Sci/Informatics
Description coming soon

Chemistry

CHEM 490: Undergraduate Seminar
Description coming soon

CRN: 70527

CHEM 790: Graduate Seminar
Description coming soon

CRN: 70903

Computational Science and Informatics

CSI 709: Verification & Validation of Models
Special Topics

CRN: 75106

CSI 747: Nonlinear Optimization/Applications
Introduction to practical aspects of nonlinear optimization. Covers applications of optimization algorithms to solving problems in science and engineering. Applications include data analysis, materials science, nanotechnology, mechanics, optical design, shape design, and trajectory optimization.

CRN: 81758

CSI 899: Colloquium in Computational Science/Informatics
Description coming soon

CRN: 73752

Computational Social Science

CSS 739: Developing High Impact Research Questions
Special Topics

CRN: 83185

CSS 739: Verification & Valid of Models
Special Topics

CRN: 75109

CSS 898: Research Colloquium in Computational Social Science
Seminar

CRN: 78806

Environmental Science and Policy (400 level)

EVPP 490: Climate Lead, Equity & Resilience

We examine socioeconomic & ecological inequities which may arise from or be exacerbated by climate change. This includes equity issues related to climate itself, plus climate mitigation, adaptation & resilience to changes in our climates. After examining case studies across sectors (e.g., housing, food systems, higher education) and regions of our world, we turn our attention to how we could help to ensure that Mason's next climate action plan is both equitable and accountable to its stakeholders and customers, including students. The resulting policy recommendations will be conveyed to the University’s Office of Sustainability for consideration in Mason’s second climate action plan (to be published in spring 2023.

CRN: 82962

EVPP 490: Geographical Approaches to Sustainable Development
Sustainability lies at the intersection of the environment, society and economics. This course explores the concepts of sustainable development at different geographical scales (local, national and international). We examine the applications, indicators, measurement tools of sustainable development for analysis and decision making in support of environmentally sustainable development from a geographic perspective. Case studies and problem-solving exercises will be used to stimulate learning and provide practical experience in addressing sustainable development issues. 

CRN: 82363

EVPP 490: Leadership for Sustainability
Description coming soon

CRN: 82961

EVPP 490: Special Topics in Environmental Science and Policy
Description coming soon

CRN: 80863

EVPP 491: Experimental Design for Environmental Scientists
Description coming soon

CRN: 78305

Environmental Science and Policy (500, 600, 900 level)

EVPP 505: Climate Leadership, Equity & Resilience

We examine socioeconomic & ecological inequities which may arise from or be exacerbated by climate change. This includes equity issues related to climate itself, plus climate mitigation, adaptation & resilience to changes in our climates. After examining case studies across sectors (e.g., housing, food systems, higher education) and regions of our world, we turn our attention to how we could help to ensure that Mason's next climate action plan is both equitable and accountable to its stakeholders and customers, including students. The resulting policy recommendations will be conveyed to the University’s Office of Sustainability for consideration in Mason’s second climate action plan (to be published in spring 2023.

CRN: 83454

EVPP 505: Fundamental Concepts of Evolution

This course will provide a basic refresher on basic concepts and mechanisms in evolution and of their applications to different fields, from theoretical biology to applied science. Material used in this course includes a textbook in evolution to cover the basics concepts and articles focusing on the history, development and application of these concepts. Additional, supporting reading material will be provided in case students want to learn more about a specific subject.  

CRN: 83186

EVPP 505: Geographical Approaches to Sustainable Development
Sustainability lies at the intersection of the environment, society and economics. This course explores the concepts of sustainable development at different geographical scales (local, national and international). We examine the applications, indicators, measurement tools of sustainable development for analysis and decision making in support of environmentally sustainable development from a geographic perspective. Case studies and problem-solving exercises will be used to stimulate learning and provide practical experience in addressing sustainable development issues. 

CRN: 82364

EVPP 505: Fundamentals of Environmental GIS
Provides the basic knowledge to explore complex environmental data sets and relationships among biological, ecological, physical and anthropogenic variables using geographic information systems. Using spatial mapping and exploration tools students will be capable of independent analysis of complex environment. Notes: Previous knowledge of fundamentals of geography, coordinate systems and map projections is an asset. Knowledge of operating systems, text editor and spreadsheet is required. 

CRN: 78322

EVPP 545: Principles of Environmental Toxicology
Explores basic principles of toxicology with an emphasis on the environment, including the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of toxicants; mechanisms of toxic action; genetic toxicology; and ecotoxicology, as well as specific examples of important toxicants. Introduces regulatory toxicology and human and ecological risk assessment.

CRN: 78316

EVPP 692: Addressing VA's Environment
Virginia is faced with significant environmental issues. How they might be addressed is covered in this seminar, with details in lectures, papers, student presentations to include: Air Pollution Issues & Response, Water Pollution Issues & Response, Water Supply and Planning, Climate Change Statewide, Waste Handling, Energy Strategies for Present & Future, Biodiversity Issues, State Resource Departments.

CRN: 78304

EVPP 692: Invasive Species Management
The course will introduce students to different aspects of invasive species management mostly centered within the United States, though examples from other parts of the world will be highlighted and discussed. Topics will include exploring the foundations of invasive species management federal policies, reviewing major classes of invasive species and transport pathways, discussing risk mitigation strategies employed for invasive species management, examining tools and techniques used in the field, reflecting upon the impacts of climate change with respect to invasive species, and delving into examples of outreach and communications strategies.  Throughout the semester, there will be guest speakers from municipal, state, and federal agencies as well as not-for-profit organizations to provide insights into current invasive species management practices.  The class is meant for students with either a natural or social science background interested in obtaining expertise in invasive species management topics.

CRN: 83029

EVPP 692: Master's Seminar
Description coming soon

CRN: 83029

EVPP 991: Advanced Seminar in Environmental Biology
Virginia is faced with significant environmental issues. How they might be addressed is covered in this seminar, with details in lectures, papers, student presentations to include: Air Pollution Issues & Response, Water Pollution Issues & Response, Water Supply and Planning, Climate Change Statewide, Waste Handling, Energy Strategies for Present & Future, Biodiversity Issues, State Resource Departments.

CRN: 78303

Geology

GEOL 332: Paleoclimatology
Explores the natural evolution of Earth's climate with the goal of providing a baseline for understanding present climate variability and future trends through increased knowledge of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence climate over the long-term.

CRN: 82307

GEOL 392: Geology and Earth Science Seminar
Undergraduate experience that includes discussion of scientific articles and attending seminars presented by outside experts, faculty, or students. Offered by Atmospheric/Oceanic/Earth Sci. May be repeated within the degree for a maximum 4 credits.

CRN: 82301

GEOL 532: Paleoclimatology
Explores the natural evolution of Earth's climate with the goal of providing a baseline for understanding present climate variability and future trends through increase knowledge of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence climate over the long-term

GEOL 536: Paleontology Seminar
Paleontology Seminar presents topical research in paleontology and paleobiology in a structured discussion among graduate students and paleontology faculty. A theme for the seminar is chosen each semester the course is offered, tailored to the interests of the students, so the topics of the seminar are timely and focused on the needs of students taking the seminar

CRN 79127

GEOL 792: Seminar Earth Systems Geology Earth Sciences
Capstone experience that includes discussion of scientific articles and attending seminars. Seminars presented by outside experts, faculty, and students. Offered by Atmospheric/Oceanic/Earth Sci. May be repeated within the degree for a maximum 12 credits.

CRN: 82312

Geography and Geoinformation Science (300 and 400 level)

GGS 307: Geography Approaches Sustainable Development
Sustainability lies at the intersection of the environment, society, and economics. This course explores the concepts of sustainable development at different geographical scales (local, national and international). We examine the applications, indicators, measurement tools of sustainable development for analysis and decision making in support of environmentally sustainable development from a geographic perspective. Case studies and problem-solving exercises will be used to stimulate learning and provide practical experience in addressing sustainable development issues.

CRN: 72882

GGS 357: Urban Planning
Reviews spatial, policy, and administration principles that guide urban planning activities in the United States. Outlines differences between theory and practice and provides tools, methods, and perspectives commonly incorporated into practice of urban planning and policy analysis.

CRN: 73421

GGS 399: Geographic Religion & Belief Systems
Description coming soon

CRN: 81805

GGS 400: Colloquium in Geoinformation Sciences
Description coming soon

CRN: 78964

GGS 470: Spatial ABM of Disease Spread
Description coming soon

CRN: 83266

Geography and Geoinformation Science (500, 600, 900 level)

GGS 507: Geographic Approaches Sustainable Development
Sustainability lies at the intersection of the environment, society and economics. This course explores the concepts of sustainable development at different geographical scales (local, national and international). We examine the applications, indicators, measurement tools of sustainable development for analysis and decision making in support of environmentally sustainable development from a geographic perspective. Case studies and problem-solving exercises will be used to stimulate learning and provide practical experience in addressing sustainable development issues. 

CRN: 73423

GGS 590: Spatial ABM of Disease Spread
Description coming soon 

CRN: 83267

GGS 590: Geographic Religion & Belief Systems
Description coming soon 

CRN: 81811

GGS 590: Urban Planning
Reviews spatial, policy, and administration principles that guide urban planning activities in the United States. Outlines differences between theory and practice and provides tools, methods, and perspectives commonly incorporated into practice of urban planning and policy analysis.

CRN: 81813

GGS 684: Selected Topics in Geospatial Intelligence
Description coming soon 

CRN: 81810

GGS 900: GGS Colloquium
Description coming soon 

CRN: 78965

Mathematics

 

MATH 493: Intro Quantum Comp and Info
Special Topics

CRN: 81914

MATH 493: Quantum Algorithms
Quantum computers are no longer simply theoretical devices, but are rapidly becoming a reality. This course will provide a rigorous and proof-oriented introduction the theory of quantum computation from the perspective of algorithms. In particular, we will introduce unitary quantum theory with no emphasis on the underlying physics. We will use quantum circuits to explore foundational theorems from quantum theory, such as the no-cloning theorem and Bell's inequalities. We will then develop algorithms for various important computational problems within the unitary model and show how these algorithms can exhibit exponential speedups over classical competitors. This course will prepare students for research or future studies within the field of quantum computing. No knowledge of computer programming is required for this course and the course will include no programming projects

CRN: 81757

MATH 629: Homological Algebra
Homological algebra is a tool for using algebraic methods (like groups and maps between them) to study objects from many areas of math (topological spaces, rings and modules, and groups). In this course, we will cover the main structures of homological algebra, including complexes, commutative diagrams, homology, cohomology, and some specific examples of these things that come up in algebra and topology.

CRN: 81751

MATH 689: Nonlinear Optimization and App
Introduction to practical aspects of nonlinear optimization. Covers applications of optimization algorithms to solving problems in science and engineering. Applications include data analysis, materials science, nanotechnology, mechanics, optical design, shape design, and trajectory optimization.

CRN: 75288

MATH 689: Quantum Algorithms
Special Topics

CRN: 81755

MATH 689: Combinatorial Geometry
The main topics to be covered: Some lattice theory; closure operators; convex polytopes; their face lattices; Euler’s relation; arrangements of hyperplanes; valuations on the family of convex polytopes in Rd. (Examples of valuations include the function that assigns the length to a line segment, the area to a convex polygon, etc., the function that gives
the number of points with integer coordinates inside the convex polytope, and the Euler characteristic.) The following side topics will provide some additional tools in the study.

  • Matroids: These give combinatorial abstractions of the linear dependencies in subsets of a finite set in a vector space. The family of planar graphs comes up here in an
  • interesting way.
  • Oriented matroids: These give a purely combinatorial way to study convex closure in vector spaces over ordered fields.
  • Some graph theory related to permutahedra and to Coxeter arrangements of hyper-planes.

CRN: 81754

Neuroscience

NEUR 411: Nervous System Injury & Disease
Most likely, you know someone that has been affected by a nervous system disorder. From Traumatic Brain Injury to Alzheimer’s Disease, nervous system disorders affect millions of families and have long fascinated doctors, scientists, and the general public. In this course, we will explore what happens when things go wrong in the nervous system. Specifically, we will explore a wide variety of nervous system disorders, focusing primarily on the cellular and molecular mechanisms at play. We will also examine the history, significance, symptoms, and treatment of these disorders. We will accomplish this through a combination of lectures, discussion boards, writing exercises and assignments. This course is designed to develop your skills in reading, analyzing, and interpreting scientific data, while emphasizing practical scientific writing skills.

CRN: 82017

NEUR 411: Model Organization & Neurscientific Research
Model organisms are well-studied non-human species that are easily bred and maintained in the lab: e.g. roundworms, fruit flies, zebrafish, and lab mouse. Choosing your model is key to the tools available for research and the types of projects you can realistically do. Each model has its advantages and limitations. This course will familiarize you with the different models commonly used in neuroscience research, as well as non-model organisms. We will be reading research in multiple organisms and write a grant using a model or non-model organism. We will also be spending significant time on the scientific writing process, from reading the funding opportunity description, writing a draft, peer review, and incorporating revisions.

CRN: 82019

NEUR 461: Neuroethics
Neuroethics explores the implications of developments in basic and clinical neuroscience on social and ethical issues. This course will survey emerging questions raised by recent neuroscientific discoveries on genetic and environmental factors that influence human behavior, decision-making, personality traits, and mental states. 

NEUR 461: Neuronal Basis of Learning and Memory
Memories lost and spared in an amnesic patient, H.M. Two types of long-term memory, declarative and non-declarative, show differential sparing in amnesiacs. Short-term memory is retained. Squire’s model of memory. A monkey model of temporal lobe amnesia, Mishkin and Squire's lesion experiments.

CRN: 82634

NEUR 461: The Brain in Book and Film
Description coming soon 

CRN 82633

NEUR 461: Computational Social Neuroscience

 

Computational social neuroscience is an asynchronous online course exploring how psychoneurobiological systems implement social processes and behaviors. This introductory course aims to provide a broad overview of the social concepts, methodologies, and computational methods to inform and refine theories of social processes and behaviors.

Part 1 provides an overview of the evolutionary origins of social intelligence and the psychoneurobiological signatures of processes that drive social cognition and behavior (e.g., reading faces and bodies; understanding and interacting with others; social relationships and groups; morality and antisocial behavior).

Part 2 deals with the fundamental social neuroscience tools used to study human and non-human social processes and behavior, including functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, lesion, hormonal, and genetic approaches.

Part 3 covers computational modeling for explaining social processes and relating them to neural activity and behavior, including approaches for modeling neural mechanisms of social processes, multivariate neural response pattern analyses at varying spatial scales, and time-varying connectivity patterns between regions of the social brain.

By learning about social concepts, methodologies, and computational methods, students will gain insights into how people create, understand, and navigate their complex social environments being the focus of the interdisciplinary field of computational social neuroscience.

NEUR 612: Neuroethics
Neuroethics explores the implications of developments in basic and clinical neuroscience on social and ethical issues. This course will survey emerging questions raised by recent neuroscientific discoveries on genetic and environmental factors that influence human behavior, decision-making, personality traits, and mental states. 

CRN: 82555

NEUR 689: Computational Social Neuroscience

 

Computational social neuroscience is an asynchronous online course exploring how psychoneurobiological systems implement social processes and behaviors. This introductory course aims to provide a broad overview of the social concepts, methodologies, and computational methods to inform and refine theories of social processes and behaviors.

Part 1 provides an overview of the evolutionary origins of social intelligence and the psychoneurobiological signatures of processes that drive social cognition and behavior (e.g., reading faces and bodies; understanding and interacting with others; social relationships and groups; morality and antisocial behavior).

Part 2 deals with the fundamental social neuroscience tools used to study human and non-human social processes and behavior, including functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, lesion, hormonal, and genetic approaches.

Part 3 covers computational modeling for explaining social processes and relating them to neural activity and behavior, including approaches for modeling neural mechanisms of social processes, multivariate neural response pattern analyses at varying spatial scales, and time-varying connectivity patterns between regions of the social brain.

By learning about social concepts, methodologies, and computational methods, students will gain insights into how people create, understand, and navigate their complex social environments being the focus of the interdisciplinary field of computational social neuroscience.

Physics

PHYS 703: Seminar in Physics
This seminar/colloquium course welcomes a myriad of reputable physics speakers. Previous semesters’ speakers can be found here. Details on this year’s speakers will be available closer to the start of the semester

CRN: 76286